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2024-06-13 02:43:31

Electric power lines

Building and using electrical power lines.

How to apply

Send your application to the Swedish Energy Markets Inspectorate (Ei) (contact Ei)

About the concession

A company wishing to build and use electric power lines must apply for a permit (called a network concession) from the Swedish Energy Markets Inspectorate (Ei) to operate such a business.

The reason is that electricity supply network companies each have a monopoly within a geographical area or for a specified power line because it is unsuitable from both the environmental and socio-economic perspectives for electricity supply networks to compete with each other.

It is the Ei that decides on whether a transmission line may be built, except in cases where the transmission line connects to a neighbouring country’s grid. In such cases, the EI processes the application, but it is the Swedish Government that decides whether to grant the network concession or not.

A network concession may be granted for a single power line or for a geographical area.

  • A network concession for a power line applies to a single line with a defined route and is most common for power lines in regional networks or the national grid.
  • A network concession for a geographical area is granted primarily for a local supply network and covers a geographically defined area where the concession holder has the exclusive right to build power lines and connect customers. As of 1 august 2021 it is also possible to apply for a network concession for a geographical area for a regional supply network. That kind of concession does not however grant an exclusive right to build power lines within that area. Companies that hold a geographical area concession need not apply to the Ei for a concession for each power line to be constructed, however other permits may be required from affected county administrative boards, for example.

In general, a network concession is valid until further notice. A network concession for a power line may be subject to review after 40 years from the date that the network concession was granted. There are certain exemptions from the network concession requirement, for what are termed non-concessioned networks (IKN). Read more about this on Ei’s website (in Swedish only).

The holder of a network concession for a power line is under an obligation to operate the line. This means that the holder of a network concession must not take the line out of commission except for shorter periods to perform maintenance or similar measures.

If you want to decommission a power line for which you hold a network concession, the network concession must be cancelled.

You must also have received a decision on what restoration measures you must take before you start to decommission the power line. Even where the network concession has expired, you must wait for a decision on what restoration measures you may be required to take.

Read more about the concession on Ei’s website (in Swedish only)

Laws and regulations

Ellagen (1997:857) External link. (legislation, in Swedish only)

Förordning (2021:808) om nätkoncession External link. (regulation, in Swedish only)

If you are rejected

How to appeal - Read more about this on verksamt.se External link.

Appley via Point of Single Contact - Read more about this on verksamt.se External link.

Contact us

Phone: 016-162700

Address: Box 155 631 03 ESKILSTUNA

Email: registrator@ei.se

Web: ei.se (https://www.ei.se)

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For some languages, you can use the browser's translation function.

If you visit ei.se and use the automatic translation function to translate the available information, you should treat the information with some caution, as the translations will not be completely reliable.

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